Active Shooter Preparedness

Active Shooter Preparedness

Preparing Your Workplace for an Active Shooter

It’s heartbreaking to acknowledge that violence in the workplace occurs. According to the CDC more than 15,000 employees became a workplace homicide victim over the last 20 years. Four-fifths of these injuries were a result of gunfire.

It’s difficult to imagine something like this would occur where you work. Yet nearly half of all shooting incidents take place in commercial locations.

Survivors of active shooting incidents have successfully sued their companies for neglect in not offering defensive training on how to handle such situations. Refusing to address the potential hazards of an energetic shooter in your office might also be a violation of the OSHA Health And Wellness Act.

It’s important to help your staff understand the potential danger of a situation as well as how handle one should it occur.

First, be on the lookout for employees that show signs of:

  • Radical changes in behavior.
  • Aggressive behavior such as yelling, pushing, or intimidating others.
  • Outward aggressive anger toward coworkers or supervisor.
  • Increasing frequency of referencing violent actions.

Encourage your staff to be aware of and report these indications to their supervisor, security or police as required.

You should also ensure your staff knows how to stay safe.

Most active shooter incidents happen quickly and last minutes. You need to train your team to be prepared for potential scenarios, as well as when to leave, shelter, or fight in place as necessary.

Leave– This is the primary way of protection, provided there is an available path to safely escape. Training should include emergency contact processes and how to quickly evacuate facilities.

Shelter– Occasionally escape is not possible. Your staff will need to find a safe hiding area. Places to hide should be out of the active shooter’s line of vision and be very easy to evacuate if the situation changes. Good hiding places allow your team to secure or blockade doors.

Fight– This is a last resort. The key is to distract or incapacitate. Methods can include screaming, hand-to-hand protection strategies, and also improvising weapons.

Finally, you should be sure your team understands how to behave when the authorities show up. When evacuating the building, advise staff to leave personal items behind and keep their hands empty, up, and clearly visible. They also must comply with instructions issued by law enforcement.

And also remember, we’re only a phone call or email away if you have questions about workplace safety and how it impacts your insurance costs.

Do This When Workplace Accidents Happen

Do This When Workplace Accidents Happen

Office mishaps happen. They happen regularly and some are severe. OSHA requires employers to take all reasonable actions to protect their personnel from office injuries & work-related health challenges. To comply, it’s vital that you have procedures in place for evaluating accidents that occur.

1. Establish what took place. You’ll need to analyze the scene of the mishap (including any type of equipment utilized during the occurrence), speak to the injured staff member (when possible) as well as collect the accounts of various other workers that witnessed the occurrence. Collect the names of the injured parties, descriptions of the injuries or damage that occurred, and also a timeline of the case.

Questions to Ask:

  • Where did the occurrence take place?
  • What was the employee doing at the time of the accident?
  • Was the employee participating in a brand-new work procedure?
  • Were other employees in the area?
  • Just what were the witnesses doing at the time of the occurrence?
  • What injuries resulted?
  • What damage did the mishap create?

2. Identify why it took place. Office accidents hardly ever happen in a vacuum. Accidents happen typically due to moving too quickly, overconfidence, disregarding security procedures, and also lack of prep work. Examining the details will help you determine the underlying causes.

More Questions to Ask:

  • What are the conditions where the issue occurred?
  • Was the staff member qualified to carry out the job?
  • Was the worker properly trained to perform the operation?
  • Was the employee making use of appropriate tools and equipment?
  • Were these tools/devices in good condition?
  • Did the employee comply with all business safety and security policies?
  • Was the employee receiving appropriate guidance?

3. Establish how you can protect against future mishaps. Leverage a situation to help you discover how to prevent future situations.

Questions to Consider:

  • What short and long-term actions can you take to eliminate such events in the future?
  • Do you have to adjust your work environment safety and security methods to ensure compliance?
  • How do you handle assessing your environment and personnel?

If you would like more info on best practices to handle workplace safety, please contact our insurance team…